Christians and Israel (2) – Modern Israel is not Biblical Israel

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1 Response to Christians and Israel (2) – Modern Israel is not Biblical Israel

  1. Michael Pahl says:

    This is from a friend on Facebook, worth posting here: “Can promises be fulfilled differently from how the receiver would have understood them? Would Abraham agree that the “land” promise is fulfilled by Christ? Or… would Abe freak out if he saw my face and I were to tell him I’m his descendant?”

    And my response:

    “You’ve got right to the nub of the hermeneutical questions. Some quick thoughts: 1) Yes, If you found the historical Abe he would likely freak out if he saw either of our faces and we started singing “Father Abraham.” 2) I’m talking about an expansion of God’s promises to Abraham, not a replacement or a bi-covenantalism. It’s like God promising a mountain in the distance, I see a mountain, but it turns out to be a whole mountain range. This makes the best sense of the NT overall, I think, including Paul’s “grafting in” imagery in Rom 11 (not uproot and replace, not plant a parallel tree, but graft in the Gentiles). 3) I think if we want to take seriously the NT’s reading of the OT, we have to say “yes” to your overall question. Just read 2 Cor 1:20 or 3:14-16, or just the idea that Gentile inclusion in the people of God is a divine “mystery” that is only now revealed to the apostles (Eph 3:2-6; Col :25-28). And it’s not just Paul on Abraham’s descendants: there’s John the Baptist and Jesus hinting at such things (Matt 3:9; Luke 3:8; John 8:39-40). 4) The land is left unstated in the NT, but given the strong trajectory of the NT in the direction I’ve described, I think it makes the best sense that the land is included in this kind of fulfillment of the promises.”

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